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Ming WenPhoto of Ming Wen
Sociology
ming.wen@soc.utah.edu

Ming Wen is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, a faculty member of the Asian Studies Program, and an IPIA assistant investigator. Her main research interests include social disparities in health and illness, racial and ethnic inequalities in health and healthcare, urban sociology, and immigration in the US. She is also interested in health issues in China. Her work has been published in such journals as, Social Science & Medicine, Health Services Research, Sociology of Health and Illness, Journal of Gerontology:Social Sciences, Health, Medical Care, Cancer, Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer, and Journal of Peace Research.

Currently Ming Wen is working on several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health or private foundations. One project is to examine the effects of ethnicity, nativity, years in the U.S., and living in neighborhoods with high concentration of Asians on cancer risk factors in seven largest Asian American groups, using data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and Census data. She is also analyzing data from the National Survey of America’s Families (NSAF) to disentangle pathways that potentially contribute to the persistent link between race/ethnicity and health among American children and adolescents. She recently started another project to explore social ecological determinants at the individual, family, school, and neighborhood level of health-detrimental behaviors among adolescents, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescents (Add Health). In a recently funded study, she examines how the physical features of the built environment and the social ecological characteristics of local neighborhoods uniquely, jointly, and interactively contributes to physical activity at the individual level, using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods—Community Survey (PHDCN-CS), the Metropolitan Chicago Information Center Metro Survey (MCIC-MS), GIS-based data, and Census data.